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How to Solve | Learn Analytical Reasoning Questions in Test | Quiz


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#1 Musa

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    Musa
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Posted 09 March 2014 - 11:14 AM






Here below is the solution of your problems of Analytical Reasoning Questions. I have gathered this solution for you from different sites and now its in one place. Best of Luck all the candidates.

 

How to Solve | Learn Analytical Reasoning Questions in Test | Quiz

 

 

• The term "analytic reasoning" refers to recognizing patterns and connections in a variety of information.

 

• Each analytical reasoning question is a logical puzzle, based on a given set of conditions

 

• Analytical reasoning questions are presented in groups of four or five questions. Each group is based on a short passage followed by a set of conditions.

 

• Analytical Reasoning test measures your ability to analyze and to draw result from a complex situation by applying your logic.

 

 

• Analytical Reasoning questions are designed to assess the ability to consider a group of facts and rules, and, given those facts and rules, determine what could or must be true. The specific scenarios associated with these questions are usually unrelated to law, since they are intended to be accessible to a wide range of test takers. However, the skills tested parallel those involved in determining what could or must be the case given a set of regulations, the terms of a contract, or the facts of a legal case in relation to the law. In Analytical Reasoning questions, you are asked to reason deductively from a set of statements and rules or principles that describe relationships among persons, things, or events.

 

• Analytical Reasoning questions appear in sets, with each set based on a single passage. The passage used for each set of questions describes common ordering relationships or grouping relationships, or a combination of both types of relationships. Examples include scheduling employees for work shifts, assigning instructors to class sections, ordering tasks according to priority, and distributing grants for projects.
 

• Analytical Reasoning questions test a range of deductive reasoning skills. These include:

 

• Comprehending the basic structure of a set of relationships by determining a complete solution to die problem posed (for example, an acceptable seating arrangement of all six diplomats around a table)

 

• Reasoning with conditional ("if-then") statements and recognizing logically equivalent formulations of such statements

 

• Inferring what could be true or must be true from given facts and rules

 

• Inferring what could be true or must be true from given facts and rules together with new information in the form of an additional or substitute fact or rule

 

• Recognizing when two statements are logically equivalent in context by identifying a condition or rule that could replace one of the original conditions while still resulting in the same possible outcomes
 

Analytical reasoning Types

• Seating Arrangements

• Sequencing

• Combinations

• Comparisons

• Selections

• Ranking

• Relations

• Grouping

 

 

Techniques used for Analytical problem solving

• Van Diagrams

• Math Operators

• Line up representation

• Equations

• Table representation

• Diagrams & Notations

• Basic Linear Sequence Game set up

• If then Notation:

• Grouping Game Diagrams
 

Math Symbols

tumblr_n24icriKbc1sdq4z7o1_500.png

 

Any good diagramming system must be:

• Fast - You must be able to express ideas in shorthand to save time

 

• Neat - messy notations will cost You points

 

• Easy to Understand —You must instantly understand what your notations mean
 

1: Entities

 

• One of the first steps in setting up your diagram is write down a letter or number to represent each of your entities. Each game will have a list of entities that will be placed into an order or groups or both. Start by writing down this list of entities. For example: you are told that there are 5 different clogs in a race and they are a Labrador, Mixed Breed, Newfoundland, Poodle, and a Schauzer. Record this list of entities as follows:

 

L  M  N  P  S

 

• Notice that we only used one letter for Mixed Breed. There is no sense in confusing yourself with additional letters. Keep it to one letter per entity. Also notice that the entities are given in alphabetical order. However, they will often leave our a letter or two to confuse you. Some students will unwittingly insert that letter by force of habit. For example in this question many students might just add in the letter O because the are used to O following L M N. Make sure your list of entities matches those given.

 

• Now that we have our list of entities we can move on to the diagram itself.
 

 

2: Basic Linear Sequence Game set up

 

• A Linear Sequence Game will ask you to place a set of entities in order. This could be expressed in a number of ways including: 1st to 6th, First to Last, Monday to Friday, Top to Bottom, Front to Back, etc.

 

• In order to make a place for each entity in your diagram simply lout an underline for each space where an entity will go. So if we are told to list five dogs in order from fastest to slowest we can set up our game as follows:

•                 ____    _____    _____    _____    ______

• We now have 5 spots for our 5 dogs. If you want you could put F and S at the ends of the diagram to represent that it goes from Fastest to Slowest. This is usually not necessary and can waste time when you are re-drawing your diagram. If you chose to include this extra notation make sure that the F and S do not match any of your entities. For example if you had a Schnauzer as one of your dog types you would not want to have S for Schauzer and S for slowest. One way you can avoid this is to put the f and s for fast and slow in lower case.
 

 

3: Fixed Entity

 

• If we are told that an entity is placed in one spot then we can just fill that directly into the diagram. This is the easiest type of rule to include. For example if we are told that the Schnauzer will be 3rd fastest then we can include it as follows:
 

tumblr_n24o9sTJUW1sdq4z7o1_500.png

• Not in that spot: If we are told that a particular entity does not go in a particular spot we should add that directly to our diagram by putting the entity under that spot and designating that it does not go there. There are number of ways to designate that the entity does not go there. You can put a slash through it, or put — in front of the entity. Find one that works best for you. For example if we are told the the Poodle is not the fastest dog we can include it in our diagram as follows:
tumblr_n24ogf5Pdx1sdq4z7o1_500.png

 

4: Here or There Pair notation:

• This notation is used when two entities are going to fill two spots but we don't know which entity is in which spot. For example if K and T must be in spots 2 and 3. We know we either have K in 2 and T in 3 or T in 2 and K in 3.

 

• The way to express this with the Here or There Pair notation is as follows:

 

tumblr_n24oqriTr51sdq4z7o1_500.png
5: If then Notation

• Use an arrow ====> for If then statements. Just rewrite the if then statement replacing If and then with ====> arrows. Also remember to shorten the entity to the first letter.

 

• For example the statement: If Albert is included then Bert is also included. Can be expressed as:

 

• ====> A ====> B

 

6: Spots Between notation:

 

• If we are told that entities are a specific number of spots apart simply insert that many blank lines between them. For example: Two runners come after Sarah but before Fred. Can be expressed as

 

S   ____   _____   F

 

• This can be combined with the Here or There Pair notation.

 

Example: Two runners come between Sarah and Fred.

 

S/F ____    ____   F/S

 

Example: 1

• 7 persons live in a street, having houses in line. Consider the following:

 

1. A lives in the corner's house.

2. 2. C is between E and G 3.

3. There is 1 house between D and F 4.

4. F is neighbor of G s.

5. There are two houses between A and G

 

Solution

 

7 Persons A,B,C,D,E,F,G

 

• 7 persons live in a street

 

We can make

X  X  X  X  X  X  X

 

1.A lives in the corner's house

 

So, there are two possibilities:

 

A  X  X  X  X  X  X  

X  X  X  X  X  X  A

 

2. C is between E and G

 

Here, also two possibilities:

 

E  C  G

G  C  E

 

3. There is 1 house between D and F Two possibilities:

 

D  X  F

F  X  D

4. F is neighbor of G

 

2 possibilities

 

F  G or G  F

 

There are two houses between A and G

 

A  X  X  G

G  X  X  A

 

Two houses between A and G:               X  X  G

 

C is between E and G:                           A  E  C  G

 

F is neighbor of G:                             A  E  C  G  F

 

1 house between D and F :               A E C G F X D

 

And finally:                                        A  E  C  G  F  B  D

 



Example: 2

• As part of their sports physical, seven college athletes F, G, H, I,J, K and L are being weighed. In announcing the results of the physical exams, the coach has given the following information.

 

i. None of the athletes is exactly the same weight as another athlete.

ii: K is heavier than L, but lighter than H.

iii. I is heavier than J

iv. Both F and G are heavier than H.

 

Solution

• We Can Make Such relations from Given Information

 

1: Seven College athletes are          F  G  H  I  J  K  L

 

i. None of the athletes is exactly the same weight as another athlete. So we can represent as  F > G > H > I > J > K > L

ii: K is heavier than L, but lighter than H.

H > K > L

iii: I is heavier than J :            I > J

 

iv. Both F and G are heavier than H.                        F  >  G  >  H  OR  G  >  F  >  H

• So the overall relation for Given athlete becomes

 

H > K > L

 

F > G > H > k > L  OR  G > F > H > k > L

 

Where I > J can be adjusted anywhere in Above relations Any Single Athlete or more can be possible between I & J Such as                                     I > F > JI > J > GI > H > K > J

Question. 1: Each of the following could be true EXCEPT

 

A. F is the heaviest.

B. G is the heaviest.

C. I is the heaviest.

D. More than three athletes are heavier than K.

E. More than three athletes are lighter than K.

 

Answer is E

 

• As Maximum three athletes can be lighter than K

 

• F > G > H > k > L > I > J  OR  G > F > H > k > L > I > J

 

Question.2: Which of the following, if true, would be sufficient to determine which athlete is the lightest?

 

A. I is the heaviest

B. I is lighter than K

C. K is heavier than J

D. J is heavier than K

E. Exactly five students are lighter than F.

 

Answer is D

 

• If J is heavier than K then simply L will be the Lightest

• F > G > H > k > L  OR  G > F > H > k > L  and  I > J before K.

 

 

Question. 3: If J is heavier than F, how many different rankings by weight, of the athletes are possible?

 

A. 1

B. 2

C. 3

D. 4

E. 5

 

Answer is D

 

• As F > G > H > k > L  OR  G > F > H > k > L  &  I > J > F

• If J > F then following relations can be possible

• I > J > F > G > H > k > L

• I > J > G > F > H > k > L

• I > G > J > F > H > K > L

• G > I > J > F > H > K > L

Question. 4: If H is heavier than I, which of the following CANNOT be true?

 

A. I's weight is equal to the average of F's weight and G's weight.

B. I's weight is equal to the average of K's weight and L's weight

C. J's weight is equal to the average of K's weight and L's weight

D. J is the second lightest.

 

Answer is A

 

As H > I so possible relations can be

 

F > G > H > k > I > L > J  OR  G > F > H > I > k > J > L
 

 

May this information help you out.. if this is helpful than please share it with other social web sites.



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#2 Awayis

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 10:08 PM




Thanks, it helped me allot for understanding the analytical questions. :rolleyes:



  • 0

#3 sania250

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Posted 23 September 2014 - 07:21 AM




Thanks, Very nice trick you have shared to solve the test. I will follow it.



  • 0

#4 sabaqamar

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 05:27 PM




Your forum is very helping for Pakistani students and youth to prepare NTS test.



  • 0

#5 kelly008

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    • LocationUnited Kingdom

Posted 28 February 2015 - 05:33 AM




Wow it looks awesome this post is really. This is the pattern that most of the NTS test will have I think so.



  • 0

#6 mehranali91

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Posted 07 March 2015 - 06:40 PM




hey bro the example 1 can also be solved in this pattrn or sequence..

DBFGCEA

if we put A into last.



  • 0

#7 Seema arif

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Posted 08 March 2015 - 09:36 AM




its help me allot for analytical reasoning



  • 0

#8 Mateen dar

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Posted 09 March 2015 - 04:49 AM




what is test type for jr investigation officer?



  • 0

#9 kelly008

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Posted 17 March 2015 - 02:48 AM




Very nice. You are doing a really good job the way you described all this is awesome.



  • 0

#10 amanat77

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Posted 31 March 2015 - 03:14 PM




it is a helpful post for me...

thx alot dear.......



  • 0

#11 hina1ubaid

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Posted 14 June 2015 - 12:37 PM




it helped me alot thanku :)  :rolleyes: 



  • 0

#12 MusubBinOmair

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Posted 20 June 2015 - 06:30 PM




Thanks!



  • 0

#13 MAYA

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Posted 11 December 2015 - 09:53 AM




very nice post..



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#14 sumaya

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Posted 16 December 2015 - 04:42 PM




I need more assistance

  • 0

#15 Sangi Sahib

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Posted 12 March 2016 - 05:31 AM




nice berooooo



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#16 nabeel ahmad rana

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Posted 22 March 2016 - 06:23 PM




Here below is the solution of your problems of Analytical Reasoning Questions. I have gathered this solution for you from different sites and now its in one place. Best of Luck all the candidates.

How to Solve | Learn Analytical Reasoning Questions in Test | Quiz



• The term "analytic reasoning" refers to recognizing patterns and connections in a variety of information.

• Each analytical reasoning question is a logical puzzle, based on a given set of conditions

• Analytical reasoning questions are presented in groups of four or five questions. Each group is based on a short passage followed by a set of conditions.

• Analytical Reasoning test measures your ability to analyze and to draw result from a complex situation by applying your logic.


• Analytical Reasoning questions are designed to assess the ability to consider a group of facts and rules, and, given those facts and rules, determine what could or must be true. The specific scenarios associated with these questions are usually unrelated to law, since they are intended to be accessible to a wide range of test takers. However, the skills tested parallel those involved in determining what could or must be the case given a set of regulations, the terms of a contract, or the facts of a legal case in relation to the law. In Analytical Reasoning questions, you are asked to reason deductively from a set of statements and rules or principles that describe relationships among persons, things, or events.

• Analytical Reasoning questions appear in sets, with each set based on a single passage. The passage used for each set of questions describes common ordering relationships or grouping relationships, or a combination of both types of relationships. Examples include scheduling employees for work shifts, assigning instructors to class sections, ordering tasks according to priority, and distributing grants for projects.

• Analytical Reasoning questions test a range of deductive reasoning skills. These include:

• Comprehending the basic structure of a set of relationships by determining a complete solution to die problem posed (for example, an acceptable seating arrangement of all six diplomats around a table)

• Reasoning with conditional ("if-then") statements and recognizing logically equivalent formulations of such statements

• Inferring what could be true or must be true from given facts and rules

• Inferring what could be true or must be true from given facts and rules together with new information in the form of an additional or substitute fact or rule

• Recognizing when two statements are logically equivalent in context by identifying a condition or rule that could replace one of the original conditions while still resulting in the same possible outcomes

Analytical reasoning Types
• Seating Arrangements
• Sequencing
• Combinations
• Comparisons
• Selections
• Ranking
• Relations
• Grouping


Techniques used for Analytical problem solving
• Van Diagrams
• Math Operators
• Line up representation
• Equations
• Table representation
• Diagrams & Notations
• Basic Linear Sequence Game set up
• If then Notation:
• Grouping Game Diagrams

Math Symbols
tumblr_n24icriKbc1sdq4z7o1_500.png

Any good diagramming system must be:
• Fast - You must be able to express ideas in shorthand to save time

• Neat - messy notations will cost You points

• Easy to Understand —You must instantly understand what your notations mean

1: Entities

• One of the first steps in setting up your diagram is write down a letter or number to represent each of your entities. Each game will have a list of entities that will be placed into an order or groups or both. Start by writing down this list of entities. For example: you are told that there are 5 different clogs in a race and they are a Labrador, Mixed Breed, Newfoundland, Poodle, and a Schauzer. Record this list of entities as follows:

L M N P S


• Notice that we only used one letter for Mixed Breed. There is no sense in confusing yourself with additional letters. Keep it to one letter per entity. Also notice that the entities are given in alphabetical order. However, they will often leave our a letter or two to confuse you. Some students will unwittingly insert that letter by force of habit. For example in this question many students might just add in the letter O because the are used to O following L M N. Make sure your list of entities matches those given.

• Now that we have our list of entities we can move on to the diagram itself.


2: Basic Linear Sequence Game set up

• A Linear Sequence Game will ask you to place a set of entities in order. This could be expressed in a number of ways including: 1st to 6th, First to Last, Monday to Friday, Top to Bottom, Front to Back, etc.

• In order to make a place for each entity in your diagram simply lout an underline for each space where an entity will go. So if we are told to list five dogs in order from fastest to slowest we can set up our game as follows:
• ____ _____ _____ _____ ______
• We now have 5 spots for our 5 dogs. If you want you could put F and S at the ends of the diagram to represent that it goes from Fastest to Slowest. This is usually not necessary and can waste time when you are re-drawing your diagram. If you chose to include this extra notation make sure that the F and S do not match any of your entities. For example if you had a Schnauzer as one of your dog types you would not want to have S for Schauzer and S for slowest. One way you can avoid this is to put the f and s for fast and slow in lower case.


3: Fixed Entity

• If we are told that an entity is placed in one spot then we can just fill that directly into the diagram. This is the easiest type of rule to include. For example if we are told that the Schnauzer will be 3rd fastest then we can include it as follows:

tumblr_n24o9sTJUW1sdq4z7o1_500.png
• Not in that spot: If we are told that a particular entity does not go in a particular spot we should add that directly to our diagram by putting the entity under that spot and designating that it does not go there. There are number of ways to designate that the entity does not go there. You can put a slash through it, or put — in front of the entity. Find one that works best for you. For example if we are told the the Poodle is not the fastest dog we can include it in our diagram as follows:
tumblr_n24ogf5Pdx1sdq4z7o1_500.png

4: Here or There Pair notation:
• This notation is used when two entities are going to fill two spots but we don't know which entity is in which spot. For example if K and T must be in spots 2 and 3. We know we either have K in 2 and T in 3 or T in 2 and K in 3.

• The way to express this with the Here or There Pair notation is as follows:

tumblr_n24oqriTr51sdq4z7o1_500.png
5: If then Notation
• Use an arrow ====> for If then statements. Just rewrite the if then statement replacing If and then with ====> arrows. Also remember to shorten the entity to the first letter.

• For example the statement: If Albert is included then Bert is also included. Can be expressed as:

• ====> A ====> B

6: Spots Between notation:

• If we are told that entities are a specific number of spots apart simply insert that many blank lines between them. For example: Two runners come after Sarah but before Fred. Can be expressed as

S ____ _____ F


• This can be combined with the Here or There Pair notation.

Example: Two runners come between Sarah and Fred.

S/F ____ ____ F/S


Example: 1
• 7 persons live in a street, having houses in line. Consider the following:

1. A lives in the corner's house.
2. 2. C is between E and G 3.
3. There is 1 house between D and F 4.
4. F is neighbor of G s.
5. There are two houses between A and G

Solution

7 Persons A,B,C,D,E,F,G

• 7 persons live in a street

We can make

X X X X X X X


1.A lives in the corner's house

So, there are two possibilities:

A X X X X X X

X X X X X X A


2. C is between E and G

Here, also two possibilities:

E C G

G C E


3. There is 1 house between D and F Two possibilities:

D X F

F X D

4. F is neighbor of G

2 possibilities

F G or G F

There are two houses between A and G

A X X G

G X X A


Two houses between A and G: A X X G

C is between E and G: A E C G

F is neighbor of G: A E C G F

1 house between D and F : A E C G F X D

And finally: A E C G F B D



Example: 2
• As part of their sports physical, seven college athletes F, G, H, I,J, K and L are being weighed. In announcing the results of the physical exams, the coach has given the following information.

i. None of the athletes is exactly the same weight as another athlete.
ii: K is heavier than L, but lighter than H.
iii. I is heavier than J
iv. Both F and G are heavier than H.

Solution
• We Can Make Such relations from Given Information

1: Seven College athletes are F G H I J K L

i. None of the athletes is exactly the same weight as another athlete. So we can represent as F > G > H > I > J > K > L

ii: K is heavier than L, but lighter than H.

H > K > L

iii: I is heavier than J : I > J

iv. Both F and G are heavier than H. F > G > H OR G > F > H

• So the overall relation for Given athlete becomes

H > K > L


F > G > H > k > L OR G > F > H > k > L


Where I > J can be adjusted anywhere in Above relations Any Single Athlete or more can be possible between I & J Such as I > F > J, I > J > G, I > H > K > J

Question. 1: Each of the following could be true EXCEPT

A. F is the heaviest.
B. G is the heaviest.
C. I is the heaviest.
D. More than three athletes are heavier than K.
E. More than three athletes are lighter than K.

Answer is E

• As Maximum three athletes can be lighter than K

• F > G > H > k > L > I > J OR G > F > H > k > L > I > J


Question.2: Which of the following, if true, would be sufficient to determine which athlete is the lightest?

A. I is the heaviest
B. I is lighter than K
C. K is heavier than J
D. J is heavier than K
E. Exactly five students are lighter than F.

Answer is D

• If J is heavier than K then simply L will be the Lightest
• F > G > H > k > L OR G > F > H > k > L and I > J before K.


Question. 3: If J is heavier than F, how many different rankings by weight, of the athletes are possible?

A. 1
B. 2
C. 3
D. 4
E. 5

Answer is D

• As F > G > H > k > L OR G > F > H > k > L & I > J > F
• If J > F then following relations can be possible
• I > J > F > G > H > k > L
• I > J > G > F > H > k > L
• I > G > J > F > H > K > L
• G > I > J > F > H > K > L
Question. 4: If H is heavier than I, which of the following CANNOT be true?

A. I's weight is equal to the average of F's weight and G's weight.
B. I's weight is equal to the average of K's weight and L's weight
C. J's weight is equal to the average of K's weight and L's weight
D. J is the second lightest.

Answer is A

As H > I so possible relations can be

F > G > H > k > I > L > J OR G > F > H > I > k > J > L


May this information help you out.. if this is helpful than please share it with other social web sites.


  • 0

#17 furqan jameel

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Posted 02 May 2016 - 01:24 PM




hey bro the example 1 can also be solved in this pattrn or sequence..
DBFGCEA
if we put A into last.



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Thanked by 1 Member:

#18 Shams Khan

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Posted 06 August 2016 - 02:54 PM




brother i found your method very fine and best.. but i cannot see the images of symbols that you have added .. can you plz send me these images or upload them properly



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#19 Shams Khan

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Posted 06 August 2016 - 02:56 PM




Very nice. You are doing a really good job the way you described all this is awesome.

yeah



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#20 Kirangsc

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 09:42 PM




well defined, i'll surely follow it :) thanks you so much.



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